ALL ROADS LEAD, Coburn Projects, New York, 2016
       
     
 I want to represent the road as an object in itself by removing the destination, taking out the “to”. These paths have no beginning and no end, but if one looks closely a new network, made of the interstices between each cobblestone, appears. These new roads are hiding within, like city blocks seen from the sky, tracing an endless grid.
       
     
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ALL ROADS LEAD, Coburn Projects, New York, 2016
       
     
ALL ROADS LEAD, Coburn Projects, New York, 2016

Roads are a paradoxical vector of civilization. While they allow for fast transport of people and goods, they also limit freedom of displacement to the locations which they link. They allowed the Roman Empire to take hold and to prosper, speeding its trade routes and projecting its armies throughout Europe and beyond. They also ironically facilitated the Barbarian Invasions that ended the empire. By definition, roads are never considered for themselves but rather for the destinations they reach or for the function one allocates to them. A road never ends, it always connects with another road in a narrower or a wider network. The web of roads is infinite.

 I want to represent the road as an object in itself by removing the destination, taking out the “to”. These paths have no beginning and no end, but if one looks closely a new network, made of the interstices between each cobblestone, appears. These new roads are hiding within, like city blocks seen from the sky, tracing an endless grid.
       
     

I want to represent the road as an object in itself by removing the destination, taking out the “to”. These paths have no beginning and no end, but if one looks closely a new network, made of the interstices between each cobblestone, appears. These new roads are hiding within, like city blocks seen from the sky, tracing an endless grid.

main.jpg